Reminders

Safety 2007 Supplementary

Safety: 2007 Archive - Supplementary Information

People cannot enjoy life if they feel their safety and security are at risk. Violent crime rates are one measure of safety. Property crimes, safety when driving, and general feelings of safety are other ways to measure safety.

For each of the following indicators, please grade Waterloo Region's performance. The same indicator for other communities has been included to provide points of comparison.

Note: Unless otherwise indicated, references to "Kitchener" refer to the Kitchener Census Metropolitan Area (CMA).

Crimes Against Property

Table II-2: Property Crime Rate per 100,000 Population in Vital Signs Communities, 1991-2005
 19911992199319941995199619971998
Kitchener54875757530142944723465041824322
 19992000200120022003200420051991-2005 % change
Kitchener4041361635443699364935773351-38.9

Note: Property crimes include breaking and entering, all theft, possession of stolen goods and all fraud.

Source: Statistics Canada, Table 252-0013, Cansim series V12404161, V12404185, V12404189, V12404193, V12404213, V12404229, V12404221, V12404233, V12404245, V12404257, V12404273, V12404281, V12404285, V12404289, V12404297, V12404301, V12404305 were used for CMAs. CA data found through a Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics special run.

At 3,351 per 100,000 persons in 2005, the property crime rate in Kitchener was 90 per cent of the national average and 119 per cent of the provincial average. The rate was down 39 per cent from that in 1991 and at the lowest level recorded over 1991-2005.

National Comparisons (PDF)

The Criminal Code Traffic Crime Rate

Table II-3-a: Criminal Code Traffic Crime Rate Per 100,000 Population in Vital Signs Communities, 1991-2005
 19911992199319941995199619971998
Kitchener713750696697305347294276
 19992000200120022003200420051991-2005 % change
Kitchener266.5268.7222.0212.1186.5186.2191.9-73.1

Note: The total traffic Criminal Code offences; this includes impaired and dangerous operation of boats, aircraft and motor vehicles, driving a motor vehicle while prohibited, as well as failure to stop or remain at the scene following an accident.

Source: Statistics Canada, Table 252-0013, Cansim series v12412654, v12412678, v12412682, v12412686, v12412706, v12412714, v12412722, v12412726, v12412738, v12412750, v12412766, v12412774, v12412778, v12412782, v12412790, v12412794, v12412798

At 192 per 100,000 persons in 2005, the traffic crime rate in Kitchener was 52 per cent of the national average and 76 per cent of the provincial average. The rate was down 73 per cent from 713 per 100,000 in 1991, the earliest year for which data are available.

National Comparisons (PDF)

Violent Crime

Table II-1: Violent Crime Incidence Per 100,000 Population in Vital Signs Communities, 1991-2005
 1991199219931994199519961997199819992000200120022003200420051991-2005 % change
Kitchener882913899749618739749802669690639573565620556-37.0

Note: Violent crime includes homicide, attempted homicide, assault, sexual assault, sexual offences, robbery and abduction

Source: Statistics Canada, Table 252-0013, Cansim series v12397903, v12397927, v12397931, v12397935, v12397955, v12397963, v12397971, v12397975, v12397987, v12397999, v12398015, v12398023, v12398027, v12398031, v12398039, v12398043, v12398047 were used for CMAs. CA data found through a Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics special run.

At 556 per 100,000 persons in 2005, the violent crime rate in Kitchener was 41 per cent below the national average (943 per 100,000) and roughly 26 per cent below the provincial rate for Ontario (748 per 100,000). The violent crime rate is down from a high of 913 per 100,000 in 1992 and is down 37 per cent from 882 per 100,000 in 1991, the earliest year for which data are available.

National Comparisons (PDF)

General Satisfaction with Personal Safety

Table II-5: Personal Safety and Perceptions for Vital Signs CMAs, 2004
 Per cent for Population 15 and Older
Perceived Change in Neighbourhood Safety Over Past 5 yearsGeneral Satisfaction with Personal SafetyFeeling of Safety When Home Alone in Evening or NightFeeling of Safety Waiting for or Using Public Transportation Alone After DarkFeeling Of Safety Walking Alone in Neighbourhood After Dark
IncreasedDecreasedSatisfiedDissatisfiedFeel WorriedFeel Not at All WorriedFeel WorriedFeel Not at All WorriedFeel Somewhat/ Very UnsafeFeel Safe
Kitchener285*96n.a237613*2414*77

Note: See Appendix Table II-5-i-v for more detailed information. n.a implies that figures are too unreliable to be published and * indicates that the numbers should be used with caution.

Non- CMA areas exclude residents of the Yukon, Nunavut and the Northwest Territories.

Source: Statistics Canada, General Social Survey, 2004. cycle 18 overview: personal safety and perceptions of the criminal justice system. Information for provinces from the General Survey on Victimization, Cycle 18: An Overview of Findings, 2004, Table 4.
http://www.statcan.ca/english/freepub/85-566-XIE/85-566-XIE2005001.pdf
http://www.statcan.ca/english/freepub/85-565-XIE/85-565-XIE2005001.pdf

For CMAs Very Safe and Reasonably Safe were combined for the safe category for walking alone after dark and Very Satisfied and Somewhat Satisfied were combined under general satisfaction with personal safety. See Appendix.

In terms of personal safety and perception of crime, in 2005, 96 per cent of persons in Kitchener felt generally satisfied with their personal safety. This was 2 per cent higher than the national and the provincial averages.

Appendix Table II-5-iii: Population Aged 15 and Older by Feelings of Safety When At Home Alone in the Evening or At Night by CMA, 2004.
 Per cent
Feel WorriedFeel Not at All WorriedNever Home Alone in the Evening or At NightDon't Know/ Not Stated
Kitchener2376n.an.a

Figures may not total 100% due to rounding. n.a implies that figures are too unreliable to be published and * indicates that the numbers should be used with caution. For Provinces only Worried and Not at All Worried were options.

Note: Includes all respondents whether or not they are home alone in the evenings or at night

Source: Statistics Canada, General Social Survey, 2004. cycle 18 overview: personal safety and perceptions of the criminal justice system. Information for provinces from the General Survey on Victimization, Cycle 18: An Overview of Findings, 2004
http://www.statcan.ca/english/freepub/85-565-XIE/85-565-XIE2005001.pdf

Appendix Table II-5-iv: Population Aged 15 and Older by General Satisfaction With Personal Safety by CMA, 2004
 Per cent
Very SatisfiedSomewhat SatisfiedDissatisfiedDon't Know/ Not Stated
Kitchener4848n.an.a

Figures may not total 100% due to rounding. n.a implies that figures are too unreliable to be published and * indicates that the numbers should be used with caution. Only Satisfied and Dissatisfied Available options for Provinces

Source: Statistics Canada, General Social Survey, 2004. cycle 18 overview: personal safety and perceptions of the criminal justice system. Information for provinces from the General Survey on Victimization, Cycle 18: An Overview of Findings, 2004
http://www.statcan.ca/english/freepub/85-565-XIE/85-565-XIE2005001.pdf
http://www.statcan.ca/english/freepub/85-566-XIE/85-566-XIE2005001.pdf

Appendix Table II-5-v: Population Aged 15 and Older by Perceived Change in Level of Crime in Neighbourhood During the Past 5 Years by CMA, 2004
 Per cent
IncreasedDecreasedAbout the SameDon't Know/ Not Stated
Kitchener285*5610*

Figures may not total 100% due to rounding. n.a implies that figures are too unreliable to be published and * indicates that the numbers should be used with caution.

Source: Statistics Canada, General Social Survey, 2004. cycle 18 overview: personal safety and perceptions of the criminal justice system. Information for provinces from the General Survey on Victimization, Cycle 18: An Overview of Findings, 2004
http://www.statcan.ca/english/freepub/85-565-XIE/85-565-XIE2005001.pdf
http://www.statcan.ca/english/freepub/85-566-XIE/85-566-XIE2005001.pdf

National Comparisons (PDF)

One's Feeling of Safety When Out Alone

Appendix Table II-5-i: Population Aged 15 and Older by Feelings of Safety Walking Alone in Neighbourhood After Dark by CMA, 2004.
 Per cent
Feel Very SafeFeel Reasonably SafeFeel Somewhat/ Very UnsafeDoes Not Walk Alone After DarkDon't Know/ Not Stated
Kitchener324514*10*n.a

Figures may not total 100% due to rounding. n.a implies that figures are too unreliable to be published and * indicates that the numbers should be used with caution. For Provinces Only Safe and Unsafe were options.

Note: Includes all respondents whether or not they walked alone in their neighbourhood after dark

Source: Statistics Canada, General Social Survey, 2004. cycle 18 overview: personal safety and perceptions of the criminal justice system. Information for provinces from the General Survey on Victimization, Cycle 18: An Overview of Findings, 2004
http://www.statcan.ca/english/freepub/85-565-XIE/85-565-XIE2005001.pdf
http://www.statcan.ca/english/freepub/85-566-XIE/85-566-XIE2005001.pdf

Appendix Table II-5-ii: Population Aged 15 and Older by Feelings of Safety Waiting for or Using Public Transportation Alone After Dark by CMA, 2004.
 Per cent
Feel WorriedFeel Not at All WorriedDon't Use Public Transportation After DarkDon't Know/ Not Stated
Kitchener13*24567*

Figures may not total 100% due to rounding. n.a implies that figures are too unreliable to be published and * indicates that the numbers should be used with caution. For Provinces only Worried and Not at All Worried were options.

Note: Includes all respondents whether or not they use public transportation alone after dark

Source: Statistics Canada, General Social Survey, 2004. cycle 18 overview: personal safety and perceptions of the criminal justice system. Information for provinces from the General Survey on Victimization, Cycle 18: An Overview of Findings, 2004
http://www.statcan.ca/english/freepub/85-565-XIE/85-565-XIE2005001.pdf
http://www.statcan.ca/english/freepub/85-566-XIE/85-566-XIE2005001.pdf

National Comparisons (PDF)

Other

Table II-4: Police per 100,000 population in Vital Signs Communities, 2000 and 2006
 20002006
Kitchener127143

Note: Ontario data exclude officers at RCMP headquarters and Saskatchewan data excludes officers at the RCMP Training Academy. Data for Lethbridge based on pre-census population estimates.

Note: Police is defined to include municipal police, RCMP, QPP, OPP and Newfoundland Constabulary; only permanent, full-time officers are included. It is notable that these numbers are derived from 2006 police count, but 2005 population count

At 143 police officers per 100,000 in 2006, the incidence of police officers in Kitchener was 74 per cent of the national average and 76 per cent of the provincial average. The rate was up 13 per cent from that in 2000.

http://dsp-psd.communication.gc.ca/Collection-R/Statcan/85-225-XIE/85-225-XIE.html.

Source for 2006 data: Statistics Canada. Police Resources in Canada 2006, Table 4a, p.25.
http://dsp-psd.communication.gc.ca/Collection-R/Statcan/85-225-XIE/85-225-XIE2006000.pdf.

Source for 2006 data: Statistics Canada. Police Resources in Canada 2000, pages 21, 38, 40 and 48.
http://dsp-psd.communication.gc.ca/Collection-R/Statcan/85-225-XIE/0000085-225-XIE.pdf.

National Comparisons (PDF)


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